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20131028
20131105
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CSPAN 13
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
invincible's. then we will have someone from california to talk about immigration. pardon me. weekends,w, on the "book tv" is on c-span two. will be featuring helena, montana. we have local content. we go on the road and visit with cities throughout the nation and learn the literary history. you will see those segments this weekend on "book tv" and tv." here istory a portion. citiess one of the few on our preconceived the spires of the cathedral and not have people fighting with each other. cathedralres of the and minarets and not have people fighting with each other between the two places. government. people understand and appreciate what government can do and cannot do. they know what it does well and what it does not do well. we have a lot of young families and people who love to mountain bike and ski or walk on trails. they kayak in the summer. it is a very active population. the biggest of expansion of this town since the statehood in 1889 -- we have struggled over these last 10 or 15 years to maintain the quality of life in small-town feeling and intimacy that people have around
the week to discuss further amendments and other topics like replacing our broken immigration system of the more disappointingly the little light workload this week of a day and a half is emblematic of how the next two months are calendar for this house of representatives. there's only 19 days left of work for this house before the end of the year. the house is only in session for 2 1/2 days before we recess in a week. again, i think that the american people expect and demand a minimum 40-hour workweek from the people that they hired to represent them here in washington. i think most people of this country have more than 19 days that they have to work in november and december. that's two full months. november and december. and yet we only have 19 days over that two-month period that this body will be in session. and yet there are critical issues that the american people are demanding that we act on. as an example today is the 302nd day of 2013 that we have failed to bring to the floor a comprehensive immigration reform bill. time is running short. and the need for a comprehensive imm
basis for our country. and that is immigration reform. by refusing to act on comprehensive immigration reform, there is great cost to the american people in job the undermining of the rule of law and destruction of the opportunities that will arise by tackling this head on. the longer bewe delay passing comprehensive immigration reform, the greater the cost of inaction in both economic, human, and security terms. every week that congress is in session for the rest of the year, i'll be here on the floor talking about the cost of naction on immigration reform. in this, there's a clear path forward a comprehensive immigration reform bill. a compromise took a little give and take from both sides. bill supported by the labor community, by the faith community, by farmers and farmworkers that passed the united states senate with more than a 2/3 majority. we've introduced a similar bill here in the house with a growing numb of bipartisan co-sponsors and are encourage the speaker and majority leader to bring this bill to a vote with we have confidence it will pass. our economy will suffer treme
. right after this was all over, the president said look, congress, the student immigration bill and a farm bill . they dropped the mic and left. you can see the tone is changing somewhat and that the expert nations and hopes are changing because we just got passed a major showdown in congress heard maybe people are worn down and actually ready to get something done. what do you think about this? the spending numbers that they're working off of so far different because the republicans in the house are working off a number that accounts for the sequester cuts happening. the democrats in the senate not so. as a result of that what you have is that they're looking for a sequester replacement. they're trying to find savings elsewhere in the budget now the savings can you be spending cuts or the closing of tax loopholes. these tax expenditures. either way, you're looking for ways to bridge the gap which is about $90 billion. but that might be some way to find ground in the middle. host: our guests joining us for discussion this morning. let's start off with rich who is joining us from
. barack obama wants to pass immigration reform. he wants to have a strong infrastructure bill. he's offered a deal, compromise that would combine long-term corporate tax reform and infrastructure investment as a pro-growth, pro-jobs grand bargain your he has many, many priorities he wants, and none of them in our system can get through without the cooperation of the republicans in the united states congress. that is the leverage that is given the minority party in our government. that is the leverage that is given even if you control even one house. and so in 1997 when we did the balanced budget agreement and i was one of the negotiators, we just had the white house and they have both houses of congress. but, of course, we have leverage over each other. if they wanted the medicare savings they wanted, that they want to lower the capital gains, they had to get bill clinton to change his position. if we're going to get the children's health initiative, the hope scholarship, investment funding for education, we have to get their cooperation. that is the mutual leverage that leads to
. a german traveler i described the scene in as idyllic while in 1840 immigrant called it a prairie land. a year after lamarr visit, thomas bell wrote on his brother, i must consider this the most beautiful country i ever saw yet what i've seen. the most beautiful lands i've ever be held or ever expected. james jones in 1839 letter to lamarr expressed equal enthusiasm. we are marching through a beautiful country. it is rarely if at the witness i imagine in any other part of the american continent. mirabeau lamarr, politician, farmer, adventure and military hero was also a poet. one imagine him regarding the stunning beauty before and as he looked down the hill towards the colorado river. perhaps he composed in diverse as he gazed upon the woodlands and prairies straddling the waterway. small hills in the foreground were crowns of object, and home and live oak trees. thickets of dogwood, hackberry, elm and live oak blended the river bottom. framing his the word to beautiful streams of clearwater. in the short span of three years, mirabeau lamarr have escaped personal despair, obscurity an
else. it helps -- it's helped the immigrant community. too often we find in houston, where we have a lot of immigrants from all over the world, that someone is in the united states, they are assaulted by someone else that's in the united states, both undocumented, and the batter tells the victim that if you call the police, i'm going to send you back to where you came from. now, he can't do that. but she thinks he can do that. and so she doesn't call the police. and this guy gets away with hurting her and plus she continues to be victimized. we changed that law because they can come forward, they can get a special visa, they can testify. they can get this person prosecuteded a he should. so it's a good people of legislation and we certainly need to be enforcing the rules under the law. people that i have come in contact with over the years have impacted me and of course many of those have been victims of crime, many of those victims of domestic violence. one that i met after i came here to congress was a wonderful lady that lives real close to us. he lives over in maryland. she's m
of immigrants who witnessed firsthand the bigotry that targeted italian-americans and he overcame the taunts and the stereotypes to achieve elected office and to assume the most powerful roles in the executive branch of government. in the nixon and ministration, -- in the nixon administration, he led a memorable battle for school integration. he faced down a government intent on trying to stop busing despite a unanimous supreme court decision that schools must be integrated. decision a gut level and chose to stand up for what he thought was right. in spite of the risks to his own career. that story did not end well for him. he was forced to resign. secretary panetta led the pentagon's repeal of don't ask don't tell policy, which had barred gays and lesbians from serving openly. he made history by extending military benefits to same-sex couples. one of his final acts before leaving the pentagon was to rescind the ban on women serving in combat. last vestige of rules barring servicewomen from serving in combat and it paves the way for the largest expansion of their role on the front lines. pan
was a knife sharpener as the parents were immigrants. it had a special place in my heart. to see the way it has been portrayed over the years with films and media, i thought i would write about the city some way to take the form of a novel but around the beginning of 2009 with the world economy would collapse then detroit in particular all on the verge of bankruptcy and went back to roving stowed as a features writer to write to the article just about the auto industry. while i was back there i saw a journalist coming from all over the world to look at detroit as a metaphor for everything that had gone wrong. some would come for one day or to what i thought was a superficial portrait. as a native eyes started to think how i could bring more nuance to the story to spend some time they're not only read about the most of the is dark side of what goes wrong in post industrial city but the weirdness it is a very strange in darkie anthony place but also those who used to live there. a lot of the photos are shots of old factories abandon 40 or 50 years you never see the people i wanted to hayin
in 2002. president of the santa ana school board, a loishg dauth yefr a immigration attorney she met bill lockyear, the state attorney general. their 30 year age difference didn't seem to matter. >> we can talk for hours. just policy things and you know he had great stories. >> they married, settled and had a son. after bill became treasurer he transferred $1.5 million from campaign accounts into nadya's run for supervisor. she won the primary. then, spent a month in rehab. >> i started thinking you know, you're starting to drink a little bit too much. i admitted myself. >> she met a san jose construction worker dealing with his methamphetamine addiction.. >> i believed he was a genuine person when i first met him and made a stupid mistake of believing i had to save him. >> reporter: after rehab she won the election, the high point of her career. but on the personal front, she tells me, arguments led to an affair, and to her own addiction to meth. >> reporter: when did you start using? >> he introduced me to smoking meth. i was an elected official, a mother, a wife. i made a terrible, b
you were a senator. many immigrants know that the american dream is not restricted to those born in america. go to miami, chicago, san francisco, any major city in america, you will find a community that speaks your language and understand your culture and welcomes diversity and can serve as an anchor for your next venture. it is not just the big cities. you heard it from secretary pritzker and president obama. success stories. and upstate new york. singapore companies extending their supply chain to texas. german multinationals creating jobs in small towns in kentucky. ohio.ing in suburban south african energy firms investing in southwest louisiana . that is not in the future, that is now. there is no question that the united states is lucky to be bestto offer the world's climate today. made it clear that we are going to work at it even harder. it is about the future. we will refuse to sit still. a world is getting more competitive, but so are we. chases capital. i'm confident we will continue to get stronger and be more effective. reason why.s a big as you heard yesterday and d
a immigration attorney she met bill lockyear, the state attorney general. their 30 year age difference didn't seem to matter. >> we can talk for hours. just policy things and you know he had great stories. >> they married, settled and had a son. after bill became treasurer he transferred $1.5 million from campaign accounts into nadya's run for supervisor. she won the primary. then, spent a month in rehab. >> i started thinking you know, you're starting to drink a little bit too much. i admitted myself. >> she met a san jose construction worker dealing with his methamphetamine addiction.. >> i believed he was a genuine person when i first met him and made a stupid mistake of believing i had to save him. >> reporter: after rehab she won the election, the high point of her career. but on the personal front, she tells me, arguments led to an affair, and to her own addiction to meth. >> reporter: when did you start using? >> he introduced me to smoking meth. i was an elected official, a mother, a wife. i made a terrible, bad choichlts >> reporter: steve jakanie mailed me i am clean, soeb scom
that immigrants versus second generation african dissent are also, gender, highly represented in elite institutions, and we also know that the upper middle class and middle class black student are taking advantages of affirmative action laws and policy. so given all of these sordid intricacies, what are your thoughts in reference to thinking about affirmative action from those perspectives? >> first of all, everything you say is absolutely true. on my campus i see it definitely very vivid. a couple things. number one, it is a mistake for people to think that affirmative action is going to be some sort of panacea. it's a relatively modest intervention that, i mean, i think it's important that it is by no means revolutionary, for goodness sake. and, frankly, what i'm talking, we're talking about affirmative action in higher education. we are talking about the desegregation of elitism. that's what we are really talking about. the elite sector. is racial affirmative action going to be something that's going to substantially affect poor racial minorities? answer, no. it's not. because, in f
. >>> and "the wall street journal" said cookies tracking co >>> the biggest immigration find in american history. >> fbi insider john miller is here with us. >> norah and charlie, this is a story we brought a year and a half ago. a whistle-blower told us how a major tech company brought in workers to this company. why it may be a slap on the wrist. >>> superstorm sandy's smallest survivors. newborns carried nine stories after a hospital lost power. our dr. jon lapook is there. >>> plus is google trying to make a splash. the mystery barge some believe it signals an announcement from silicon valley. the news is back here on "cbs this morning." stay tuned for your local news. ♪ the only thing we have to fear is... fear itself. ♪ ♪ [ laughter ] smoke? nah, i'm good. [ male announcer ] celebrate every win with nicoderm cq, the unique patch with time release smartcontrol technology that helps prevent the urge to smoke all day long. help prevent your cravings with nicoderm cq. are you ready grandma? just a second, sweetie. [ female announcer ] we eased your back pai
" -- that comes as the president is slated to to meet with republicans at the white house on immigration today. that is the latest on immigration. pam from montclair, virginia, what are your thoughts he e -- what are your thoughts? i think she is being disingenuous if she does not know she is being tapped. we still occupy germany. military in the late 70's and early 80's. were all very afraid at that time that germany -- afraid of a united germany am a is what we have now. continue, what does that mean for today? caller: i would expect people are still fearful of a united germany. the presidents disavowing any knowledge, that is what politicians do. that is what they did in the bush administration. i feel like we have more than enough intelligence to protect ourselves. we knew that 9/11 was going to happen. we have only seen an increase of the buildup of military installations and the spying. continue with your phone calls about the nsa spying program. mike conaway, a republican from texas and a member of the intelligence committee would be here to answer your questions about today's hearing o
immigration. we have 3.1 people -- 3.1 million people come here every year. i think there is opportunity. i believe in hope and change. i believe in a better world. i don't speak for north dakota. the good people out here are probably the toughest men i have ever met in my life out here did -- out here. i see whole crews of women landscapers, men in the oil fields, there are mostly white and black eyes out here. the idea that you need illegal immigrants to work the business, or even the harvested -- i worked in the harvest and there were a lot of mexicans but a lot of white guys to. a lot of indians even. say, i the hard part to do not understand why democrats, women who have a child that is even if he has an education he's finished. i have been -- i am 49 and i have been through the ringer of reverse discrimination. i don't know how you vote against the interest of your race and people. we have to have a loyalty or your children are going to be finished. thank you for sharing your story. if you are just tuning in or joining us on c-span radio, which is heard nationwide, we have moved to xm
the boilers and electrical systems of the island's museum that documents decades of immigrant arrivals. the site had no power for months after the storm. more than a million photographs and other artifacts remain in storage while renovations continue. pediatricians are urging parents to limit children's access to tweeting, texting, and other online activities to two hours a day. the american academy of pediatrics published its new policy today in its journal "pediatrics." the group noted that unrestricted screen time and communications have been linked to cyber-bullying, obesity, and sleeplessness. jury selection opened in london today in the first criminal trial triggered by a phone- hacking scandal. rebekah brooks and andy coulson are former editors of rupert murdoch's "news of the world" tabloid, now out of business. they allegedly plotted to hack the phones of celebrities, politicians, and crime victims, and illegally paid public officials for information. wall street's week started on a subdued note. the dow jones industrial average lost a point to close below 15,569. the nasdaq f
, of find that immigrant first and second generation african consent, decent and are all so highly represented in these institutions and we also know that upper-middle-class and middle-class taking the advantage of your state of action was and policies. given all of the intricacies whether your thoughts on thinking about affirmative-action? >> everything you say is absolutely true. in my camp as i see it, definitely very vivid. a couple things. number one, seems to me it was a mistake to think that affirmative action is going to be some sort of panacea. it is a relatively modest intervention, it was important but it is by no means revolutionary. frankly what i am talking about if we are talking affirmative-action and high ridge occasion we are talking about desegregation of elites. that is what we are talking about. the elite sector. is racial affirmative-action going to be something that is going to substantially affect for raciapoor racial minorities? answer, no. to take advantage of the affirmative-action you have to been doing pretty good. to take advantage of affirmative-actio
a comprehensive immigration bill that would accomplish a lot of the goals in this committee that we simply need a vote to make it happen and i hope that we will look at all the possibilities with reducing our long-term deficit. and i think you. >> next up, we will hear from the ranking member of the senate budget committee, senator sessions. [inaudible conversations] >> thank you. and this room the people in our congress and our nation and the challenges that we face with a budget the budget and that, i believe that we can make some progress as the committee goes forward. the purpose of a budget is without a financial planner in the future of america is that it's not easy and our differences are real and it's difficult to bridge them, but their actions which we can take that we can agree on that will improve the financial standing of america and economic growth. so it is important that we work at it and i think the process of this is a positive development for sure. my colleague, ron johnson, is a successful businessman and he has told us if you want to develop a strategic plan, the first thin
. it is a bipartisan organization. issues as itjor relates to fiscal issues, immigration recently, health issues -- a number of issues we bring together. a lot of former members of commons -- we find some reason to come together that divide the country. worked as aoagland former republican staff director for the senate budget committee from 1986-2003. he is here to answer your questions on this subject of the budget conference. from eugene, lee oregon, on our line for democrats. caller: thank you very much. i have always appreciated the work of the bipartisan policy center. say that in this tragic time right now, moderates in both parties are not being heard. suggesting to are the leaders -- i know this specifically because i contacted patty murray's office for different times this year. i have yet to get a response at all from anything. i have sent suggestions. offers of how -- people on disability like myself could gain more respect publicly by taking a little less of the gift that the american people time,o us and at the same realize that the social security disability part of social weurity
-partisan. it's a bipartisan organization. we take on major housing fiscal issues, immigration recently, health issues a number of issues that we bring together. a lot of former members of congress as they try to find some common, reasoned approach to these difficulty issues that divide the country. >> bill hoagland is senior vice president at the bipartisan policy center. worked as former republican staff director of the senate budget committee from 1986 to 2003. he is here to answer your questions on this subject of budget conference, these continuing budget talks on capitol hill. we'll go to lee from eugene, oregon on the line for democrats this morning. lee, you're on with bill hoagland. >> caller: thank you very much. i always appreciated the work of the bipartisan policy center. but i must say in this tragic time right now moderates in both parties are not being heard. choices t, things we're suggestg to the leaders, and i know this specifically and i contacted patty murray's office four different times this year and have yet to get a response at all from anything. i have sent suggestions
for the history of the english-speaking peoples since 1900. she recounted her family's immigration to the united states on booktv. >> it was difficult to register an emotional voicebox, but uncle frank said he thought he was caught up in something he had no way of understanding and it is not true, they can put you in prison, you have a visa and you have papers. did you tell them how long we had been coming here. uncle frank asked uncle joseph to put the officer on the phone again and he is going to call, the officer said. he can't, heat 81 years old, he is an old man. uncle frank been asked if he could speak to my uncle one last time. cbp officers said we are to have a translator for him and hung up. at 11:00 p.m., but uncle was given chips and soda and again in 1145, he signed a form saying that his personal property was returned to him. this includes the money plus the wristwatch and i received my phone call and that 4:20 a.m., my own was transported to the detention area and by then my uncle wrapped the blanket he was given tightly around him as he curled in a fetal position on the cement bed
's falsified performance records, potentially, and it imagined immigration center in the uk for immigrant detainees. women have come out saying that they were sexually co-othersed. those are significant things. >> i would say they are very significant. and, yet, the obama administration, after these allegations came to light, increased the amount of federal dollars that this company could be receiving. is there any connection between the people who run the company and the obama administration? >> there is not a direct connection. but i do think that if you look at sort of their lobbying record. they have spent more than a million dollars in recent years on lobbying and political contributions. and you really see that kind of playing out. >> political contributions to the obama campaign? >> yeah, there was about $6,000 worth. >> right. so they basically made a rational economical could you legs, we're going to spend this much money lobbying to get a government contract from the obama administration and it paid off? >> yeah, and i think that's true. you look at the guy they chose to do it.
costs down. we can work together to support education, research, infrastructure, immigration reform, yes, even pass the farm bill. we can work together to reform important programs like medicare or social security so that we can preserve and protect them for future generations while balancing our budget and controlling spending. mr. speaker, today our economy may be stagnant but our optimism and determination have never been greater. let's work together to renew the prosperity and opportunity for all americans in our great nation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. or a mr. speaker, october's domestic violence awareness month. unconscionably domestic violence has reached pandemic proportions affecting one out of every three women in the united states. as an emergency medicine doctor, i have witnessed firsthand the devast
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)